Author archives: César Tomé

MI weekly selection #553

MI weekly selection #553

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Scientists sketch face of 1,500-year-old Chinese emperor DNA analysis, an almost complete skull and open-source software have enabled scientists to reconstruct the face of Emperor Wu, who ruled China’s Northern Zhou dynasty around 1,500 years ago and whose remains were found in 1996. Scientists have extracted more than a million single-nucleotide polymorphisms, or differences in […]

The building block for magnetoelectric spin-orbit logic

The building block for magnetoelectric spin-orbit logic

Computer scienceCondensed matterMaterials

By César Tomé

Complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) is a type of metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) fabrication process that uses complementary and symmetrical pairs of p-type and n-type MOSFETs for logic functions. CMOS technology is used for constructing integrated circuit chips, including microprocessors, microcontrollers, memory chips, and other digital logic circuits. After 50 years of continuous transistor size downscaling and […]

MI weekly selection #552

MI weekly selection #552

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Human migration received help from Toba eruption A study on an archaeological site in Ethiopia has added to evidence that indicates the eruption of Mount Toba in Indonesia 74,000 years ago might not have been apocalyptic. The study shows humans adjusted to arid conditions after the eruption in a way that might have aided migration […]

Searching for the decay of nature’s rarest isotope: Tantalum-180m

Searching for the decay of nature’s rarest isotope: Tantalum-180m

Particle physicsPhysics

By César Tomé

Tantalum is one of the rarest elements and has multiple stable isotopes. The least abundant tantalum isotope, Ta-180 is found naturally in a long-lived excited state, a feature unique to this isotope. In excited states, a nuclei’s protons or neutrons have higher than normal energy levels. Although energetically possible, the radioactive decay of this excited […]

MI weekly selection #551

MI weekly selection #551

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Europe’s heat waves may start with Arctic melting Meltwater from Arctic ice could be setting off recent hot, dry summers in Europe by changing ocean currents and air circulation. A resulting “cold blob” of water in the North Atlantic Ocean could intensify European winter storms and their westerly winds, creating a barrier of warm ocean […]

MI weekly selection #550

MI weekly selection #550

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Amphibian feeds its babies milk-like liquid A legless amphibian, called a caecilian, produces a liquid for its babies that provides lipids and sugars, similar to mammalian milk. Siphonops annulatus babies also eat their mother’s skin once a week, and the team discovered the nutritive fluid after wondering how they could be so active and eat […]

Atomic force images beyond the fundamental limit

Atomic force images beyond the fundamental limit

Computer scienceMaterialsPhysics

By César Tomé

Atomic force microscopy, or AFM, is a widely used technique that can quantitatively map material surfaces in three dimensions, but its accuracy is limited by the size of the microscope’s probe. A new AI technique overcomes this limitation and allows microscopes to resolve material features smaller than the probe’s tip. A new deep learning algorithm […]

MI weekly selection #549

MI weekly selection #549

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Why did humans evolve without tails? Though humans’ ape ancestors have tails, we evolved without them due to a single gene mutation, which was pinpointed through researching the genomes of six ape species and 15 monkey species. Scientists are unsure whether becoming tailless was an evolutionary benefit or a chance mutation, but one theory is […]

Super strong magnetic field detected in nuclear matter

Super strong magnetic field detected in nuclear matter

Particle physicsPhysics

By César Tomé

A new analysis by the STAR collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a particle collider at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, provides the first direct evidence of the imprint left by what may be the universe’s most powerful magnetic fields on “deconfined” nuclear matter . The evidence comes from […]