Category archives: Weekly Selection

MI weekly selection #406

MI weekly selection #406

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Arguments use more brain space Disagreements take up more real estate in the brain than agreements. After measuring brain activity in pairs of people either agreeing or disagreeing during discussions, researchers found that agreements activated sensory brain regions, while arguments activated cognitive regions, such as the frontal lobes. Yale Daily News Pack hunting amps up […]

MI weekly selection #405

MI weekly selection #405

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Liquid glass, a new state of matter identified A state of matter called liquid glass has been observed behaving in a way physicists say they’ve never seen before. Liquid glass, something between colloid and a solid, is created by a pair of interacting liquid-to-solid transitions. ScienceAlert Mars’ wobbly rotation keeps poles on the move Mars&#8217 […]

MI weekly selection #404

MI weekly selection #404

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

2020 has been all about Covid-19. Almost. Nature produced an excellent piece to review an extraordinary year: A review of 2020 through Nature’s editorials Quanta Magazine has produced a set of articles to remind us that science, in general, has not stopped: 2020 Biology: While the study of the SARS-CoV-2 virus was the most urgent […]

MI weekly selection #403

MI weekly selection #403

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Levant may have experienced tsunami 10K years ago Archaeologists examining sediment cores have found clues that a massive tsunami may have once hit the coast of the Levant about 10,000 years ago. The clues consisted of seashells within sediment cores they are collecting along a beach in Israel, which was much farther inland at the […]

MI weekly selection #402

MI weekly selection #402

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Ancient shipwreck offers clues about African elephants About 100 tusks found among the artifacts of a trading ship that sank in 1533 are giving researchers new insights into the African elephants that lived during that time, according to findings scheduled to be published in Current Biology. Conditions at the shipwreck site preserved DNA in the […]

MI weekly selection #401

MI weekly selection #401

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Pterosaur ancestry may have an answer Pterosaurs have been linked to a group of ancient small reptiles called lagerpetids, according to an examination of a variety of fossils from several regions. Lagerpetids, which date back between 237 million and 210 million years ago, share similar traits with pterosaurs, including inner ear shape, longer hand bones […]

MI weekly selection #400

MI weekly selection #400

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Unique electron bursts observed by space probes Probes from NASA’s Voyager spacecraft have detected a peculiar type of electron burst in a quiet region of space. The unusual thing about the bursts is that they appear to precede shock waves significantly in what study co-author Don Gurnett has called “a brand-new mechanism.” Gizmodo Quantum supremacy […]

MI weekly selection #399

MI weekly selection #399

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Calcite layers boost hardness of ants’ bodies A layer of calcite covers the bodies of leaf-cutting worker ants, allowing them to take on much bigger enemy ants, according to findings published by Nature Communications. Researchers tested ants with and without the thin calcite layer and found that the mineral makes the ants’ exoskeletons at least […]

MI weekly selection #398

MI weekly selection #398

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

New Horizons finds light in the darkness of space The New Horizons space probe, which has moved beyond its exploration of Pluto, has found evidence that space itself has its own glow. When researchers removed visible light sources from images of the open universe sent back from the space probe, now about 4 billion miles […]

MI weekly selection #397

MI weekly selection #397

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Social learning in otters Otters learn to survive by observing others in their social circles. The experiment with Asian short-clawed otters, in which the animals learned to open containers filled with meatballs after watching their peers do it, “is the first to show evidence of social learning and long-term memory in Asian short-clawed otters,” says […]