Author archives: César Tomé

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César Tomé is the editor of Mapping Ignorance.

MI weekly selection #398

MI weekly selection #398

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

New Horizons finds light in the darkness of space The New Horizons space probe, which has moved beyond its exploration of Pluto, has found evidence that space itself has its own glow. When researchers removed visible light sources from images of the open universe sent back from the space probe, now about 4 billion miles […]

MI weekly selection #397

MI weekly selection #397

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Social learning in otters Otters learn to survive by observing others in their social circles. The experiment with Asian short-clawed otters, in which the animals learned to open containers filled with meatballs after watching their peers do it, “is the first to show evidence of social learning and long-term memory in Asian short-clawed otters,” says […]

MI weekly selection #396

MI weekly selection #396

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Strange exoplanet with oceans of lava discovered Astronomers have discovered an extremely hot Earth-sized planet hundreds of light-years away that has oceans made of lava, supersonic winds and rainfall made of rocks. K2-141b is very close to its star, and most of the planet is always in daylight because it is locked in place, facing […]

MI weekly selection #395

MI weekly selection #395

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

How long ago were Denisovans on the Tibetan Plateau? Denisovans were present on the Tibetan Plateau as far back as 100,000 years ago, according to mitochondrial DNA found in layers of cave sediment. Other sediment samples dating back approximately 60,000 to possibly 30,000 years ago could suggest the Denisovans were in the region when humans […]

MI weekly selection #394

MI weekly selection #394

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Need a particle accelerator? How about a black hole? Researchers have figured out a way it would be possible for black holes to act as particle accelerators. Previously, it was thought that only theoretical “extremal” black holes would be able to allow fast-moving particles to get near enough to the event horizon without falling in […]

MI weekly selection #393

MI weekly selection #393

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Humans may pose SARS-CoV-2 risk to wildlife There is a significant risk that SARS-CoV-2 will be transmitted by people to wildlife populations, where it could spread and imperil already endangered species. The virus could persist in short-lived species, such as mice, and it could mutate in wild animal populations and be reintroduced into human populations […]

MI weekly selection #392

MI weekly selection #392

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Well-preserved, ancient dunes spotted on Mars Scientists have discovered well-preserved paleo-dunes dating back a billion years in Mars’ Valles Marineris region. The dunes, found using data from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and Mars Odyssey Orbiter, are helping researchers learn more about the consistency of Mars’ geologic history. EarthSky Ants’ sophisticated brain power Ants have been […]

MI weekly selection #391

MI weekly selection #391

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Time-lapse video highlights supernova flare NASA and the European Space Agency have released a time-lapse video of a supernova flaring culled from Hubble Space Telescope observations. The video, created from about a year’s worth of Hubble observations, shows a white dwarf exploding then fading away in the NGC 2525 galaxy about 70 million light-years from […]

MI weekly selection #390

MI weekly selection #390

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Mouse mom’s microbiome may affect her young A mouse mother’s gut microbes may play an important role in offspring’s brain development, according to findings published in Nature. Particular gut microbes produce metabolites that travel to the fetuses’ brains, affecting the growth of axons, which act as nerve cell signal transmitters. Science News Homo sapiens Y […]

MI weekly selection #389

MI weekly selection #389

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

High-resolution images offer detailed look at stellar winds Astronomers used Chile’s ALMA Observatory to take high-resolution images of stellar winds around dying red giant stars, showcasing the winds’ unusual shapes. “Some stellar winds were disk-shaped, others contained spirals, and in a third group, we identified cones,” says Leen Decin, co-author of a study on the […]