Author archives: César Tomé

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César Tomé is the editor of Mapping Ignorance.

Mi weekly selection #382

Mi weekly selection #382

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

New class of neutrinos observed A class of neutrinos generated from the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen process, far less common than the proton-proton chain, was discovered during the Borexino experiment. “With this outcome, Borexino has completely unraveled the two processes powering the sun,” says researcher Gioacchino Ranucci. Science News Getting energy from black hole possible […]

Mi weekly selection #381

Mi weekly selection #381

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Green glow detected in Mars atmosphere for first time A green glow similar to the one around Earth, caused by sunlight and oxygen mixing in the upper atmosphere, has been detected for the first time around Mars. The orientation of the MArs Discovery (NOMAD) instrument was manipulated to look across the Martian atmosphere rather than […]

MI weekly selection #380

MI weekly selection #380

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Dust may boost planets’ likelihood of habitability Faraway planets are more likely to be habitable if airborne dust is present to help keep temperatures moderate by cooling a planet’s hot side and warming its dark side. “Airborne dust is something that might keep planets habitable, but also obscures our ability to find signs of life […]

MI weekly selection #379

MI weekly selection #379

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Urban foxes in UK becoming more doglike Urban red foxes in the UK appear to be evolving to better adapt to urban life, with a shorter, more powerful snout and a smaller brain than their country cousins. They’re also becoming less afraid of humans, and “adapting to life around humans actually primes some animals for […]

MI weekly selection #378

MI weekly selection #378

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Stronger cyclones could intensify global warming The growing intensity of tropical cyclones in the Pacific may be feeding global warming by speeding up some ocean eddies, suppressing others and carrying more heat via the Kuroshio Current. “The collision of these two giant monsters — tropical cyclones and mesoscale eddies — will probably lead to dramatic […]

MI weekly selection #377

MI weekly selection #377

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Miniature robots can carry cancer drug through blood Researchers have created minuscule robots that they say could one day deliver drugs precisely to cancer cells from within patients’ blood streams. The robots, called microrollers, are spherical with a magnetic nanofilm on one half, are coated with the drug doxorubicin on the other half and can […]

MI weekly selection #376

MI weekly selection #376

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Puhahonu shield volcano is Earth’s biggest Scientists say new research shows the Puhahonu volcano, which is about 1,100 kilometers northwest of Honolulu in the Pacific Ocean and contains about 150,000 cubic kilometers of rock, is the world’s largest shield volcano. About a third of it rises above the seafloor, while the rest is buried under […]

MI weekly selection #375

MI weekly selection #375

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Ridges on moon may indicate tectonic activity Scientists who studied temperature data from a NASA orbiter say ridges on the moon may be evidence of recent tectonic activity. “From this paper, it appears that the moon may still be creaking and cracking — potentially in the present day — and we can see the evidence […]

MI weekly selection #374

MI weekly selection #374

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Ice avalanches linked to features in Mars craters Scientists who analyzed open-source multispectrum and radar data from NASA with a 3-D modeling software program and separate mathematical calculations say large, fast-moving ice avalanches may have created debris in two craters on Mars. The hupothesis could help researchers understand the moraine-like features in the planet’s north […]

MI weekly selection #373

MI weekly selection #373

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Cosmic-ray technique may help forecast volcanic eruptions Scientists used a visual technique known as muography at the active Sakurajima stratovolcano in Kyushu, Japan, in an effort to forecast eruptions. Researchers recorded muon cosmic-ray particles passing through the volcano and used the data collected to create detailed maps of the volcano’s interior, which were then analyzed […]