Author archives: César Tomé

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César Tomé is the editor of Mapping Ignorance.

MI weekly selection #389

MI weekly selection #389

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

High-resolution images offer detailed look at stellar winds Astronomers used Chile’s ALMA Observatory to take high-resolution images of stellar winds around dying red giant stars, showcasing the winds’ unusual shapes. “Some stellar winds were disk-shaped, others contained spirals, and in a third group, we identified cones,” says Leen Decin, co-author of a study on the […]

MI weekly selection #388

MI weekly selection #388

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Oldest Neanderthal DNA found in Europe holds clues to Neanderthal life Mitochondrial DNA taken from a Neanderthal tooth found in a cave in Poland is giving researchers new clues about Neanderthal life in the region about 80,000 years ago. Tools found in the cave known as Micoquian give clues to the ways Neanderthals were adapting […]

MI weekly selection #387

MI weekly selection #387

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Faraway star trio surrounded by 3 rings of dust and gas Three unusual rings of planet-forming gas and dust have been detected circling a trio of stars in the Orion constellation, about 1,300 light-years away, according to studies in Science and Astrophysical Journal Letters that have differing views on how the configuration came to be […]

MI weekly selection #386

MI weekly selection #386

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Telescope captures image of exoplanets orbiting star The Very Large Telescope in Chile has captured a direct image of a pair of exoplanets orbiting a star that’s similar to our own sun. “Even though astronomers have indirectly detected thousands of planets in our galaxy, only a tiny fraction of these exoplanets have been directly imaged,&#8221 […]

MI weekly selection #385

MI weekly selection #385

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Deep-sea fish stay hidden thanks to ultrablack skin At least 16 species of deep-sea fish have been discovered so far with ultrablack colouring that helps them stay hidden in dark water. The ultrablack color reflects less than 0.5% of light and pigment cells are packed tightly together with little or no gaps. ScienceAlert Campfire-like flares […]

MI weekly selection #384

MI weekly selection #384

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Braiding strengthens the case for anyons’ existence Physicists created a device to observe the braiding of particles known as anyons, quasiparticles thought to occur in just two dimensions. “[T]o see [anyons] in reality takes it to another level,” says theoretical physicist Frank Wilczek, who was not involved in the study but was the originator of […]

Mi weekly selection #383

Mi weekly selection #383

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Visible light through a soap bubble branches out Physicists have observed branching flow for the first time in visible light created with a laser through a soap bubble. Variations in the thickness of the soap membrane produce different color patterns and deflect the light in such a way to cause the flow of light to […]

Mi weekly selection #382

Mi weekly selection #382

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

New class of neutrinos observed A class of neutrinos generated from the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen process, far less common than the proton-proton chain, was discovered during the Borexino experiment. “With this outcome, Borexino has completely unraveled the two processes powering the sun,” says researcher Gioacchino Ranucci. Science News Getting energy from black hole possible […]

Mi weekly selection #381

Mi weekly selection #381

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Green glow detected in Mars atmosphere for first time A green glow similar to the one around Earth, caused by sunlight and oxygen mixing in the upper atmosphere, has been detected for the first time around Mars. The orientation of the MArs Discovery (NOMAD) instrument was manipulated to look across the Martian atmosphere rather than […]

MI weekly selection #380

MI weekly selection #380

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Dust may boost planets’ likelihood of habitability Faraway planets are more likely to be habitable if airborne dust is present to help keep temperatures moderate by cooling a planet’s hot side and warming its dark side. “Airborne dust is something that might keep planets habitable, but also obscures our ability to find signs of life […]