Author archives: César Tomé

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César Tomé is the editor of Mapping Ignorance.

MI weekly selection #411

MI weekly selection #411

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

New observations of black hole reveal surprises Astronomers have recalculated the mass of the Cygnus X-1 black hole, the first black hole ever found, and they say it’s about one-and-a-half times more massive than once thought, detailing their findings in Science. Using observations by the Very Long Baseline Array, researchers say the Cygnus X-1 system […]

MI weekly selection #410

MI weekly selection #410

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Nearby system may host habitable exoplanet Another potentially habitable planet has been detected in the nearby Alpha Centauri system, orbiting the sunlike Alpha Centauri A. The data suggesting the exoplanet’s habitability was collected using the European Space Agency’s Very Large Telescope via the Near Earths in the Alpha Cen Region project. Space.com Brain EEG may […]

MI weekly selection #409

MI weekly selection #409

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

What we can learn about black holes from water in a tank Researchers can observe many properties of black holes through water simulations, since gravitational interactions behave like fluid. University of Nottingham scientists describe in Physical Review Letters how they witnessed backreaction for the first time by creating a vortex of water and propelling waves […]

MI weekly selection #408

MI weekly selection #408

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Range tightened for dark matter’s mass New calculations using quantum gravity have narrowed the possible range for the mass of dark matter particles, suggesting the mass can’t be very light nor very heavy. “This piece of research helps physicists in two ways: It focuses the search area for dark matter, and it will potentially also […]

MI weekly selection #407

MI weekly selection #407

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

What can we learn from 2 giant radio galaxies? The discovery of a pair of giant radio galaxies in a relatively small area has astronomers wondering if such massive galaxies are more common than previously thought. “We suspect that many more galaxies like these should exist, because of the way we think galaxies grow and […]

MI weekly selection #406

MI weekly selection #406

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Arguments use more brain space Disagreements take up more real estate in the brain than agreements. After measuring brain activity in pairs of people either agreeing or disagreeing during discussions, researchers found that agreements activated sensory brain regions, while arguments activated cognitive regions, such as the frontal lobes. Yale Daily News Pack hunting amps up […]

MI weekly selection #405

MI weekly selection #405

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Liquid glass, a new state of matter identified A state of matter called liquid glass has been observed behaving in a way physicists say they’ve never seen before. Liquid glass, something between colloid and a solid, is created by a pair of interacting liquid-to-solid transitions. ScienceAlert Mars’ wobbly rotation keeps poles on the move Mars&#8217 […]

MI weekly selection #404

MI weekly selection #404

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

2020 has been all about Covid-19. Almost. Nature produced an excellent piece to review an extraordinary year: A review of 2020 through Nature’s editorials Quanta Magazine has produced a set of articles to remind us that science, in general, has not stopped: 2020 Biology: While the study of the SARS-CoV-2 virus was the most urgent […]

MI weekly selection #403

MI weekly selection #403

Weekly Selection

By César Tomé

Levant may have experienced tsunami 10K years ago Archaeologists examining sediment cores have found clues that a massive tsunami may have once hit the coast of the Levant about 10,000 years ago. The clues consisted of seashells within sediment cores they are collecting along a beach in Israel, which was much farther inland at the […]