Recently Mapped

Many people think of their brain as a computer full of microchips and wires, as a storehouse full of memories and learned things, as a […]

Earth may have formed in just 5M years
The Earth formed in only about 5 million years, a much shorter amount of time than previously […]

The interactions between moving charges and magnetic fields can be quite complicated; more if we consider the quantum effects. One example is the collection of […]

Authors:
Cheyenne Svaldi is a MA student in the Master’s of Neurolinguistics at the University of Groningen. She is currently doing her internship and […]

Some people with autism do not get used to certain stimuli as normotypical people seem to do without problem. This would fit in with what […]

Invited Researcher

Authors:
Cheyenne Svaldi is a MA student in the Master’s of Neurolinguistics at the University of Groningen. She is currently doing her internship and […]

Author: Martha Villabona works at Centro Nacional de Innovación e Investigación Educativa (CNIIE) of the Spanish Ministry of Education and Vocational Training, where […]

Author: Iván Rivera works as an engineer in innovation projects for railroads
Twelve years have passed since the world record for rail speed was set. […]

Author: Daniel González-Muñoz is a predoctoral researcher in photocatalytic processes at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid.
Environmental problems and energy resources make it vitally important for […]

Author: Jose V. Torres-Perez (@Jovitope) is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the School of Biological and Chemical Sciencies, Queen Mary, University of London (UK).
This is […]

About Us

Sir Humphy Davy, in a discourse delivered at the Royal Society in 1825 said:

Fortunately science, like that nature to which it belongs, is neither limited by time nor by space. It belongs to the world, and is of no country and of no age. The more we know, the more we feel our ignorance; the more we feel how much remains unknown; and in philosophy, the sentiment of the Macedonian hero can never apply, — there are always new worlds to conquer.

Every time we make a new scientific discovery we sense where the limit of knowledge is, we feel where ignorance begins. Science is, for certain, what we think we know, but more precisely, it is being aware of the boundaries of the unknown.

In this blog we try to translate cutting edge scientific research into an educated lay-person language; consequently, as we do this, we will be Mapping Ignorance. Our goal is very simple: to spread both the latest developments in science and technology and a scientific worldview facilitating the access to it. To achieve this Mapping Ignorance is written by specialists in each field of expertise coordinated by a dedicated editor; the aim of them all is to make sometimes abstruse but otherwise wonderful scientific and technical information enjoyable by the interested general reader.

Mapping Ignorance is an initiative of the Chair of Scientific Culture of the University of the Basque Country under the Project Campus of International Excellence – Euskampus.