Category Archives: Humanities & Social Sciences

What does reason consist really in? What it is for? And why are humans, of all the millions of species having populated the earth, the only one that enjoys such a wonderful capacity? The French psychologist Hugo Mercier and anthropologist […]

Gary Becker presented a first economic approach to criminal behavior. In a very standard neoclassical framework he studied this apparently non-economic problem. In particular, Becker assumed rational criminals responding to variables such as the probability of being caught, the severity […]

Author: Antonio Casado da Rocha is Research Fellow, IAS-Research Center for Life, Mind and Society; Faculty of Education, Philosophy and Anthropology, UPV/EHU.
November 25, 1858, was a very cold day in Concord, Massachusetts. It was then that Henry David […]

This post summarizes the article “Confirmation bias with motivated beliefs”, by Charness and Dave, published in Games and Economic Behavior in 2017.
Confirmation bias (CB) can be defined as an agent’s tendency to seek, interpret and use evidence in a […]

This article summarizes the Babcock et al. (2017) , recently published in the American Economic Review.

Among the different reasons to explain the gender gap in the labor market one is the process by which men and women advance […]

In the previous entry, I described Nick Bostrom’s argument for the ‘simulation hypothesis’, i.e., the conjecture that we are very, very likely living not in a ‘real’ world, but within some kind of computer simulation, and ended offering some […]

One important principle of any sensible social epistemology is that the fraction of crazy-sounding ideas that are really crazy is extremely high. Of course, a lot of crazy-sounding ideas have turned out being right (e.g., the evolution of different species […]

The last issue of the Journal of Economic Perspectives published the article Is China Socialist? by Barry Naughton , which I summarize here.

In order to address the question, the first thing Naughton does is to provide a working definition […]

Theory of mind is the ability to attribute mental states—beliefs, intents, desires, knowledge, etc.— to oneself and others and to understand that others have beliefs, desires, intentions, and perspectives that may be different to ourselves. Attributing thoughts to others allows […]

This article summarizes the work by Baker, Bloom and Davis (2016) published in the last issue of the Quarterly Journal of Economics.

The economy does not like uncertainty. Or so goes a common saying among economic agents. In fact, economic […]