Category archives: Humanities & Social Sciences

When did we become fully human? What fossils and DNA tell us about the evolution of modern intelligence

When did we become fully human? What fossils and DNA tell us about the evolution of modern intelligence

Anthropology

By Invited Researcher

When did something like us first appear on the planet? It turns out there’s remarkably little agreement on this question. Fossils and DNA suggest people looking like us, anatomically modern Homo sapiens, evolved around 300,000 years ago. Surprisingly, archaeology – tools, artefacts, cave art – suggest that complex technology and cultures, “behavioural modernity”, evolved more […]

The ‘prehistory’ of philosophy of science (2):  Is there a doctor on board?

The ‘prehistory’ of philosophy of science (2): Is there a doctor on board?

Philosophy of science

By Jesús Zamora Bonilla

I would like to think that the first work devoted to something that we might call ‘the problem of scientific method’ was written by Democritus (around 460-370 BC), the author the philosophical systems of Plato and Aristotle were constructed against, and whose ideas were so revolutionary that it seems that nobody in the last centuries […]

Participatory budgeting, some issues

Participatory budgeting, some issues

Economics

By Invited Researcher

Participatory budgeting seeks to involve some form of public deliberation in the budget allocation of a city or town. The first process took place in Porto Alegre (Brazil) in the late eighties. Since then the practice spread through the world, with more than 7,000 processes around the world in 2018. The logic underpinning participatory budgeting […]

The death of History

The death of History

History

By Jesús Zamora Bonilla

Doing Ancient History is a difficult job. You may be thinking about the lot of hard work historians have to perform in order to learn just a little bit of what happened millennia ago, but I would like to invite you to consider another more fundamental obstacle in a discipline like this: the fact that […]