Category archives: Philosophy of science

On theory and observation (1):  The theoretician’s dilemma

On theory and observation (1): The theoretician’s dilemma

Philosophy of science

By Jesús Zamora Bonilla

Contemporary philosophy of science was, at least during its first decades (those of the glorious Vienna Circle), a kingdom of radically empiricist and positivist intellectuals: scientific knowledge had to be obtained and tested mainly through experiment, and everything that could not be robustly grounded on experimental observations was just dangerous speculation and metaphysics. The connections […]

The ‘prehistory’ of philosophy of science (11):  On ancient science and scientific progress, or Artemidorus’ dream

The ‘prehistory’ of philosophy of science (11): On ancient science and scientific progress, or Artemidorus’ dream

Philosophy of science

By Jesús Zamora Bonilla

Just to take stock of what we have encountered in the previous entries of this series, regarding the ideas of contemporary philosophy of science than can find some kind of ‘ancestor’ in the works of ancient ‘philosophers’, we can mention Plato’s and Aristotle’s discussion about what are the essential differences and relationships between ‘scientific’ and […]

The ‘prehistory’ of philosophy of science (10):  From logical stoicism to logical positivism.

The ‘prehistory’ of philosophy of science (10): From logical stoicism to logical positivism.

Philosophy of science

By Jesús Zamora Bonilla

According to the traditional myth, mentioned in passing in the first entry of this series, contemporary philosophy of science would have started in the post-WWI Vienna, when a group of young philosophers and scientists, under the heading of Moritz Schlick, attempted to show how scientific knowledge could be unambiguously derived from observational data (or at […]