Category archives: Philosophy of science

On theory and observation (3): Scientists selling lemons, a game-theoretic analysis of how scientific facts are constructed

On theory and observation (3): Scientists selling lemons, a game-theoretic analysis of how scientific facts are constructed

Philosophy of science

By Jesús Zamora Bonilla

In our trip through the philosophical discussion about the nature of observation in science, I propose to take a different route from the most classical ones, and probably a surprising one for most of you. Akerlof’s classic paper ‘The Market for Lemons’, one of the founding works of the Economics of Information, presented an idealised […]

Should we really believe scientific facts will last forever?

Should we really believe scientific facts will last forever?

Philosophy of science

By Invited Researcher

Astronomers once believed the Sun revolved around the Earth. In the 19th century, scientists thought the shape of a person’s skull could reveal their mental strengths or weaknesses. And in the 20th century, many scientists fiercely opposed the idea that continents drift. All views that have since been completely overturned. So can we trust the […]

On theory and observation (1):  The theoretician’s dilemma

On theory and observation (1): The theoretician’s dilemma

Philosophy of science

By Jesús Zamora Bonilla

Contemporary philosophy of science was, at least during its first decades (those of the glorious Vienna Circle), a kingdom of radically empiricist and positivist intellectuals: scientific knowledge had to be obtained and tested mainly through experiment, and everything that could not be robustly grounded on experimental observations was just dangerous speculation and metaphysics. The connections […]