Author Archives: Sergio Laínez

Sergio Laínez
Sergio Lainez Vicente has spent more than a decade studying ion channels in research centres across Europe. After getting his PhD in the Sensory Biology lab at the CIPF (Valencia, Spain), he moved to Nijmegen (The Netherlands) as a postdoctoral fellow to work on divalent cation reabsorption in kidney. Studies in pain physiology at University of Cambridge, King's College London, and the Neuroscience and Pain Research Unit Pfizer had in Cambridge (Neusentis) would follow. Recently, he has accepted a senior research associate position at the University of Bristol to get involved in an MRC-funded project aiming to reduce the incidence of sudden death on patients with heart failure.

The other day I came across an article about the revolution of cultured meat at El País Semanal, although that was not the first time I read about this. Still, I have to admit is such a shocking subject that […]

The identification of previously unknown proteins is a difficult task and often requires to follow unconventional thinking. In my previous post, I have described how the TRPV1 ion channel (formerly known as the capsaicin receptor) was discovered by combining the […]

Doing research in molecular biology is not straightforward, because most of the experimental work is based in the study of molecules which cannot be seen by the unaided eye. Instead, we rely on indirect evidence given by methods which are […]

The stem cell research field shocked the scientific community back in 2006 thanks to Shinya Yamanaka, who found a way to obtain pluripotent stem cells from adult somatic cells . The recipe consisted of just four genes encoding for transcription […]

Laboratory mice are one of the most valuable tools scientists rely on to understand how pathologies work. In order to find a cure for a disease, we need to have comprehensive knowledge of the physiological processes which are impaired. […]

We perceive the world surrounding us through our senses. Thanks to them we can have a pleasant time listening to Claude Debussy or get delighted by the scent of rosemary. We blindly trust them, but are they always truthful? A […]

The way we approach pain therapies doesn’t differ from the ones taken for other diseases. The aim is to look for molecular targets, which can be suitable for chemical intervention thoroughly assessing both efficacy and safety profiles for the drug, […]

We all have listened about gene therapy, and for those who are old enough not in a good way, at all. Gene therapy became the most promising clinical therapy in the 1990s and this technology was meant to transform […]

Last Friday I was, as is always the case listening to an enthusiastic talk given by one of the PhD students from my department. As part of her PhD work, she is trying to understand why periodontitis, an inflammatory […]

We are one of a kind because our genetic background says so. When our parents conceived us, one set of chromosomes from each of them merged to create a brand new diploid cell called zygote, which is already unique. […]