Recently Mapped

It is said that Washington Irving’s biography of Christopher Columbus, published in 1828, was the work that started the legend that the discoverer of America […]

Protein found in bacteria can act like a prion . A portion of a protein within the microbe Clostridium botulinum can act like a prion […]

The other day I came across an article about the revolution of cultured meat at El País Semanal, although that was not the first time […]

Carbon has four valence electrons. To fill its octet, it requires four additional electrons, which can be obtained through the formation of four covalent bonds. […]

Pigmentations are among the clearest examples of phenotypic variation in many species. Hair, skin and eye colors are highly heritable and visible traits in humans. […]

Invited Researcher

Author: Koldo Garcia-Etxebarria got his Ph.D. in genetics at UPV/EHU in 2010. After a couple of years at the Evolutionary Biology Institute (CSIC-UPF) in Barcelona, […]

Author: Álvaro Peralta Conde is a senior researcher at CLPU (Pulsed Lasers Centre). Although unfortunately it takes place in rare situations, the synergies between scientific […]

Author:. Estibaliz Capetillo-Zarate got her Ph.D. from Bonn University in 2006. Since 2007 she has worked for the Weil Cornell Medical College. Currently she is […]

Author:. Uxio Labarta is a research professor at IIM-CSIC (Vigo, Galicia). From the Laboratory of Mussels Ecology and Culture Management, he works on the ecology, […]

Authors:. . M. Hervella & C. de la Rúa do research and teach at the Genetics, Physical Anthropology and Animal Physiology Department of the University of […]

About Us

Sir Humphy Davy, in a discourse delivered at the Royal Society in 1825 said:

Fortunately science, like that nature to which it belongs, is neither limited by time nor by space. It belongs to the world, and is of no country and of no age. The more we know, the more we feel our ignorance; the more we feel how much remains unknown; and in philosophy, the sentiment of the Macedonian hero can never apply, — there are always new worlds to conquer.

Every time we make a new scientific discovery we sense where the limit of knowledge is, we feel where ignorance begins. Science is, for certain, what we think we know, but more precisely, it is being aware of the boundaries of the unknown.

In this blog we try to translate cutting edge scientific research into an educated lay-person language; consequently, as we do this, we will be Mapping Ignorance. Our goal is very simple: to spread both the latest developments in science and technology and a scientific worldview facilitating the access to it. To achieve this Mapping Ignorance is written by specialists in each field of expertise coordinated by a dedicated editor; the aim of them all is to make sometimes abstruse but otherwise wonderful scientific and technical information enjoyable by the interested general reader.

Mapping Ignorance is an initiative of the Chair of Scientific Culture of the University of the Basque Country under the Project Campus of International Excellence – Euskampus.