Recently Mapped

If you have been following this series, I guess you will by now have learned a few surprising details about the history of western thought. […]

Lots of dark matter may lurk inside dwarf galaxy. Triangulum II, a dwarf galaxy that doesn’t have any star-forming regions, may harbor a vast […]

Ants are among the most diverse, abundant and ecologically significant organisms on earth. They have colonized almost every landmass on Earth and the only places […]

We now refer to light as the form electromagnetic radiation to which the human eye is sensitive and on which our visual awareness of the […]

In 1912, a French chemist named Louis Camille Maillard published a paper to explain what happens when amino acids react with sugars at elevated temperatures. […]

Invited Researcher

Author: . Fernando Blanco is currently a postdoc at Labpsico, the Laboratory of Experimental Psychology at the University of Deusto. Previously, he was a researcher at […]

Authors:. Ana Martín-Sánchez is currently pursuing her PhD at the Department of Functional Biology and Physical Anthropology of the University of Valencia, Spain. Carmen Agustín-Pavón […]

Author:. Miguel A. Vadillo joined University College London in 2012 as a research associate after working more than ten years at the University of Deusto. […]

Authors:. Maria-José Iriarte-Chiapusso is an Ikerbasque research professor at the Department of Geography, Prehistory and Archaeology, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU). Álvaro Arrizabalaga is […]

Author: Kepa Ruiz-Mirazo, Permanent Researcher, University of the Basque Country (UPV-EHU). . Although «cracking the origins-of-life puzzle», regardless of the reputation of the journalist who tells […]

About Us

Sir Humphy Davy, in a discourse delivered at the Royal Society in 1825 said:

Fortunately science, like that nature to which it belongs, is neither limited by time nor by space. It belongs to the world, and is of no country and of no age. The more we know, the more we feel our ignorance; the more we feel how much remains unknown; and in philosophy, the sentiment of the Macedonian hero can never apply, — there are always new worlds to conquer.

Every time we make a new scientific discovery we sense where the limit of knowledge is, we feel where ignorance begins. Science is, for certain, what we think we know, but more precisely, it is being aware of the boundaries of the unknown.

In this blog we try to translate cutting edge scientific research into an educated lay-person language; consequently, as we do this, we will be Mapping Ignorance. Our goal is very simple: to spread both the latest developments in science and technology and a scientific worldview facilitating the access to it. To achieve this Mapping Ignorance is written by specialists in each field of expertise coordinated by a dedicated editor; the aim of them all is to make sometimes abstruse but otherwise wonderful scientific and technical information enjoyable by the interested general reader.

Mapping Ignorance is an initiative of the Chair of Scientific Culture of the University of the Basque Country under the Project Campus of International Excellence – Euskampus.