Recently Mapped

The human brain continues its development postnatally. It is a long process that extends throughout, at least, the first two decades of life. Along […]

An electric current can be visualized as a flow of electrons through a conducting piece of material. The less the resistance the material structure […]

This is the second of the series of articles on the geometry of String Theory compactifications. Before reading this note, the interested reader may want […]

Here is an example of the “discursive dilemma” or “doctrinal paradox”: Say that a jury of three members must decide by majority rule whether […]

A extremely rare set of 4 quasars. Astronomers have spotted an extremely rare grouping of four quasars within about 650,000 light-years of space. The […]

Invited Researcher

Author:. Javier Peralta (Algeciras, Spain, 1979) holds a Degree in both Astrophysics and Applied Physics (Universidad de La Laguna, 2003), and a PhD in […]

Author:. Miguel Santander-García holds a PhD in astrophysics (Universidad de La Laguna). After several years working as a support astronomer for the Isaac Newton Group […]

Authors:. Pablo Bueno holds a degree in physics (University of Oviedo), a MSc in theoretical physics (Autonomous University of Madrid) and is currently completing his […]

Author:. Jaume Navarro received his PhD in history of science from the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (1998). He has been a researcher at the universities […]

Author:. Katy Price is a lecturer in modern and contemporary literature at Queen Mary University of London. . . ‘We must live before we can attain […]

About Us

Sir Humphy Davy, in a discourse delivered at the Royal Society in 1825 said:

Fortunately science, like that nature to which it belongs, is neither limited by time nor by space. It belongs to the world, and is of no country and of no age. The more we know, the more we feel our ignorance; the more we feel how much remains unknown; and in philosophy, the sentiment of the Macedonian hero can never apply, — there are always new worlds to conquer.

Every time we make a new scientific discovery we sense where the limit of knowledge is, we feel where ignorance begins. Science is, for certain, what we think we know, but more precisely, it is being aware of the boundaries of the unknown.

In this blog we try to translate cutting edge scientific research into an educated lay-person language; consequently, as we do this, we will be Mapping Ignorance. Our goal is very simple: to spread both the latest developments in science and technology and a scientific worldview facilitating the access to it. To achieve this Mapping Ignorance is written by specialists in each field of expertise coordinated by a dedicated editor; the aim of them all is to make sometimes abstruse but otherwise wonderful scientific and technical information enjoyable by the interested general reader.

Mapping Ignorance is an initiative of the Chair of Scientific Culture of the University of the Basque Country under the Project Campus of International Excellence – Euskampus.