Recently Mapped

The idea of a living fossil is rather intuitive. We think that a kind of organism deserves that denomination if it has been living […]

…if you want to want to be alive. The rock band Wilco already said it back in 2002 when they released the much-acclaimed album […]

Common traits in tame animals may be due to neural crest changes. Genetic changes that may affect a group of embryonic stem cells known […]

Of all the seven wonders of ancient times, only the pyramids of Egypt remain on their feet. The technical means Egyptians had that many […]

Slonim et al. (2014) discuss the problems of blood allocation in different countries and suggest a mechanism that can improve it. The present article […]

Invited Researcher

Author:. Maria Rentetzi is associate professor of history and sociology of science and technology at the National Technical University of Athens in Greece. She received […]

Authors:. Ángel Paredes Galán got a Ph. D. in Particle Physics from the University of Santiago de Compostela in 2004. After postdoctoral stays at École […]

Author: Alvaro Arrizabalaga received a BA in History (Vitoria, 1988) and a Master in CRM -Archaeology option- (Vitoria, 1992) at the University of the Basque […]

Author: Kepa Ruiz-Mirazo, Permanent Researcher, University of the Basque Country (UPV-EHU). . . The effort of mapping ignorance in biology is especially frustrating –or, if the […]

Authors: José Carlos R. Alcantud and Annick Laruelle . José Carlos R. Alcantud is a professor of Economics at the department of economics and economic history […]

About Us

Sir Humphy Davy, in a discourse delivered at the Royal Society in 1825 said:

Fortunately science, like that nature to which it belongs, is neither limited by time nor by space. It belongs to the world, and is of no country and of no age. The more we know, the more we feel our ignorance; the more we feel how much remains unknown; and in philosophy, the sentiment of the Macedonian hero can never apply, — there are always new worlds to conquer.

Every time we make a new scientific discovery we sense where the limit of knowledge is, we feel where ignorance begins. Science is, for certain, what we think we know, but more precisely, it is being aware of the boundaries of the unknown.

In this blog we try to translate cutting edge scientific research into an educated lay-person language; consequently, as we do this, we will be Mapping Ignorance. Our goal is very simple: to spread both the latest developments in science and technology and a scientific worldview facilitating the access to it. To achieve this Mapping Ignorance is written by specialists in each field of expertise coordinated by a dedicated editor; the aim of them all is to make sometimes abstruse but otherwise wonderful scientific and technical information enjoyable by the interested general reader.

Mapping Ignorance is an initiative of the Chair of Scientific Culture of the University of the Basque Country under the Project Campus of International Excellence – Euskampus.