Author Archives: José Luis Ferreira

<span property="name">José Luis Ferreira</span>
José Luis Ferreira is an Associate Professor at the Economics Department in Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. He studied Economics at the University of the Basque Country and obtained his PhD at Northwestern University. He has worked also at the University of Pennsylvania, ITAM and Chapman University. His main research interests are Game Theory, Experimental Economics and Economic Methodology. His publications include articles in the Journal of Economic Theory, Games and Economic Behavior, BE Journal of Theoretical Economics, Economics and Philosophy, and Analysis. He is a member of ARP-Sociedad para el Avance del Pensamiento Crítico (Society for the advancement of critical thinking).

The analysis of armed conflicts between countries has a tradition in Game Theory, starting with the classical models for the battle of the Bismark Sea by Haywood (1954) and for the nuclear conflict in the Cold War by Schelling (1960) […]

Gary Becker presented a first economic approach to criminal behavior. In a very standard neoclassical framework he studied this apparently non-economic problem. In particular, Becker assumed rational criminals responding to variables such as the probability of being caught, the severity […]

This post summarizes the article “Confirmation bias with motivated beliefs”, by Charness and Dave, published in Games and Economic Behavior in 2017.
Confirmation bias (CB) can be defined as an agent’s tendency to seek, interpret and use evidence in a […]

This article summarizes the Babcock et al. (2017) , recently published in the American Economic Review.

Among the different reasons to explain the gender gap in the labor market one is the process by which men and women advance […]

The last issue of the Journal of Economic Perspectives published the article Is China Socialist? by Barry Naughton , which I summarize here.

In order to address the question, the first thing Naughton does is to provide a working definition […]

This article summarizes the work by Baker, Bloom and Davis (2016) published in the last issue of the Quarterly Journal of Economics.

The economy does not like uncertainty. Or so goes a common saying among economic agents. In fact, economic […]

Here is an oversimplified vision of immigration: a substantial number of foreign unskilled workers enter the job market, causing a shift of the labor supply curve to the right (workers are suppliers of work), and changing the current equilibrium to […]

Different electoral rules have consequences on the strategic behavior of voters, political selection and policy outcomes. There is ample literature on the links between electoral rules and policy outcomes (see, for instance, Cox, 1997 ; Persson and Tabellini, 2000 , […]

The two biggest questions in Economics are, no doubt, efficiency and equality. The first means no dilapidation of resources, the second means…, well, it may mean many things: equality of opportunities, resources, access to basic goods, or equality of results, […]

Consider a country with two left-wing and two right-wing parties. In each side of the political spectrum one of the parties is a radical and the other is a moderate. Consider also that the moderates attract more voters than the […]