Author Archives: José Luis Ferreira

<span property="name">José Luis Ferreira</span>
José Luis Ferreira is an Associate Professor at the Economics Department in Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. He studied Economics at the University of the Basque Country and obtained his PhD at Northwestern University. He has worked also at the University of Pennsylvania, ITAM and Chapman University. His main research interests are Game Theory, Experimental Economics and Economic Methodology. His publications include articles in the Journal of Economic Theory, Games and Economic Behavior, BE Journal of Theoretical Economics, Economics and Philosophy, and Analysis. He is a member of ARP-Sociedad para el Avance del Pensamiento Crítico (Society for the advancement of critical thinking).

 
One of the topics of discussion within behavioral economics is the motivation of effort. Although the typical economic model usually assumes monetary incentives, they do not preclude the existence of other factors, like preferences for being first or psychological […]

In many group decisions unanimity is required to ensure that a reform will be adopted only if it benefits all its members. Multinational organizations may be the best example of this. However, when members have incomplete and private information about […]

 
The most used mechanism to guarantee universal education in a country is by providing free public education, where public means both publicly financing and public provision. Milton Friedman (1962) made the case to keep the public funding but make […]

Economics needs theory, lab experiments, historical data and field evidence. Pilot programs and randomized controlled trials are particularly credible from the point of view of internal validity. However, the results of these “proof-of-concept” studies do not necessarily extend beyond the […]

Competitive markets are a well understood economic mechanism. The Economic Theory explains remarkably well, at least for a social science, its properties and success along economic history. We have lab experimentation (see here), and plenty of historical evidence that […]

Very often Economics is censured for using unrealistic assumptions, like that stating that people are selfish. According to some critics (e.g., the philosopher Mario Bunge, 2010 ), this fact is enough to show the invalidity of Economic models. After all, […]

Game Theory studies mathematical models of strategic decision. Historically, the first approach was to study games as interactions of perfectly rational individuals, who have complete and transitive preferences and who are intelligent enough to analyze the game. This is a […]

Online courses are rapidly expanding. They can reach more students and reduce drastically the costs of teaching. They are, thus, an attractive option for both students and schools. Being a recent development, there is still little research to assess their […]

The analysis of armed conflicts between countries has a tradition in Game Theory, starting with the classical models for the battle of the Bismark Sea by Haywood (1954) and for the nuclear conflict in the Cold War by Schelling (1960) […]

Gary Becker presented a first economic approach to criminal behavior. In a very standard neoclassical framework he studied this apparently non-economic problem. In particular, Becker assumed rational criminals responding to variables such as the probability of being caught, the severity […]