Category Archives: Quantum physics

The idea that the solution of Schrödinger’s equation is a wave that represents, not a physical wave, but the probability of finding the associated particle in some specific condition of motion has had great success. In fact, every experiment devised […]

In ordinary life it is assumed that any physical property of an object can be measured as accurately as necessary. To reach any desired degree of accuracy would require only a sufficiently precise instrument. Wave mechanics showed, however, that even […]

By the mid-1920s it was clear that “things” (electrons, atoms, molecules) long regarded as particles also show wave properties. This fact is the basis for the currently accepted theory of atomic structure. This theory, quantum mechanics, was introduced in 1925. […]

Silicon surfaces of crystalline solids are part of conventional electronics, but their exploitation in novel materials combining two-dimensional electron states (2DESs) and magnetism, which play an important role in the development of next-generation electronics, still remains elusive. The appearance of […]

In previous posts, we have discussed the two main loopholes of Bell experiments, the locality loophole, and the detection loophole. Both were closed a long time ago, but only recently they were closed in the same experiment. Let us summarize […]

Nanoparticles of certain metals, like gold or silver, have attracted substantial interest in recent years owing to their ability to support localized surface plasmon resonances (collective oscillations of conduction electrons). These plasmonic excitations allow manipulation of light at the nanoscale […]

A new vista in spintronics was opened in 2004 with the observation of the spin Hall effect in GeAs at 20 K by David Awschlom and his group. In the spin Hall effect the electrons of a charge current flow […]

Let’s take a p-type semiconductor with a very clean surface and place it right next to the clean surface of a n-type semiconductor. This type of device is called an n-p junction diode, or simply a diode. What happens? […]

Ionization is a fundamental process in chemistry and physics, lying at the heart of many fascinating phenomena. Ionization is the process of producing ions. Certain molecules ionize in solution, for example. But ions may also be formed when an […]

The most extensive use of semiconductors, such as silicon or germanium, including their use as transistors, arises from their behavior when, after being sufficiently purified of atoms other than the basic element (e.g., silicon or germanium), very small amounts […]