Author archives: César Tomé

MI weekly selection #111

MI weekly selection #111

Humanities & Social SciencesScienceTechnologyWeekly Selection

By César Tomé

Rhesus monkeys can be taught to recognize their images in mirrors Mirror recognition can be taught to rhesus monkeys, according to researchers who say the findings could help them better understand how self-awareness develops in the brain. “Our findings suggest that the monkey brain has the basic ‘hardware’ [for mirror self-recognition], but they need appropriate […]

MI weekly selection #110

MI weekly selection #110

Humanities & Social SciencesScienceTechnologyWeekly Selection

By César Tomé

Researchers develop memory system with 900+ neurons, 165K synapses Researchers at IBM’s Almaden Research Center and South Korea’s Pohang University of Science and Technology have developed a phase-change memory chip with more than 900 neurons and 165,000 synapses that can emulate how the human brain functions, promising to advance image-recognition technology and other areas of […]

MI weekly selection #108

MI weekly selection #108

Science

By César Tomé

Human primordial germ cells created in a lab Scientists have found a way to create human primordial germ cells, or PGCs, in a lab. The research stresses they are significantly different than those of mice, calling into question the efficacy of mouse experiments as related to human cell development. Scientists reprogrammed human embryonic stem cells […]

MI’s 2014: the ten most read articles

MI’s 2014: the ten most read articles

Humanities & Social SciencesScienceTechnology

By César Tomé

At this time of the year it seems appropiate to look back and check whatever has been achieved. 2014 has been a good year for MI, with contributors located in 3 continents and 36 different academic institutions (ranging, alphabetically, from Cornell University in United States to Waseda University in Japan), publishing 153 articles. Thank you […]

MI wekly selection #106

MI wekly selection #106

Humanities & Social SciencesScienceTechnologyWeekly Selection

By César Tomé

What ‘hok’ and ‘krak’ mean to monkeys The structure of monkey calls is surprisingly sophisticated: The same species of monkeys—located in separate geographic regions—use their alarm calls differently to warn of approaching predators. Futurity.org Life would drastically change if all bacteria disappeared Living for a time without bacteria is possible, but probably not very pleasant […]

MI weekly selection #105

MI weekly selection #105

ScienceTechnologyWeekly Selection

By César Tomé

Joint oscillation of Jupiter, sun might detect gravitational waves The joint oscillation of the sun and Jupiter might hold the key to detecting gravitational waves. Oscillations from Jupiter in 2011 were detected in frequencies that matched the sun’s. Researcher Ibrahim Semiz suggests that the oscillations might have been caused by gravitational waves, and other researchers […]

MI weekly selection #104

MI weekly selection #104

Science

By César Tomé

Planck data back standard cosmic evolution model, shake up dark-matter theories Data collected by the European Space Agency’s Planck space observatory have resulted in a detailed full-sky survey of the cosmic microwave background, the remnants of radiation left behind by the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago, reaffirming the standard model of cosmic evolution. However […]

MI weekly selection #103

MI weekly selection #103

Humanities & Social SciencesScienceTechnologyWeekly Selection

By César Tomé

Hummingbird flight similar to that of insects Scientists recorded a hummingbird as it hovered then created a 3D model to assess the airflow patterns created by the flapping of its wings. While other birds use the downstroke of their wings to fly, hummingbirds use upstrokes and downstrokes to create small vortices that merge into one […]

MI weekly selection #102

MI weekly selection #102

Humanities & Social SciencesScienceTechnologyWeekly Selection

By César Tomé

Massive mountain range in Antarctica covered by protective ice The Gamburtsev Mountains in Antarctica are 100 million years old but look much younger due to lack of erosion because its massive expanse is entirely encased in ice. Scientists used airborne imaging technology to survey the range’s massive peaks and also found a network of subglacial […]