Category Archives: Genetics

Photoreceptor degeneration is one of the most common causes of partial as well as total blindness. However, one of its “positive” -or at least, not so negative- characteristics is that, while light-sensing photoreceptor cells in the surface of the retina […]

Most famous RNAs are coding or messenger RNAs (mRNAs) which are the ones that ribosomes read to synthesize proteins. However, many other RNAs are transcribed from DNA and are known as non-coding RNAs. Among those, ribosomic RNAs (rRNAs) which are […]

The term epigenetics refers to heritable changes in gene expression (active vs. inactive genes) that does not involve changes to the underlying DNA sequence. It results in change in phenotype without a change in genotype. An easily comprehensible example […]

We all have listened about gene therapy, and for those who are old enough not in a good way, at all. Gene therapy became the most promising clinical therapy in the 1990s and this technology was meant to transform […]

Last Friday I was, as is always the case listening to an enthusiastic talk given by one of the PhD students from my department. As part of her PhD work, she is trying to understand why periodontitis, an inflammatory […]

“Fear is the path to the dark side. Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering”. Grand Master Yoda. . This is the second chapter of a series of 2 articles that pretends to illustrate how […]

We are one of a kind because our genetic background says so. When our parents conceived us, one set of chromosomes from each of them merged to create a brand new diploid cell called zygote, which is already unique. […]

You have around 3,000 million letters in you genome. And so does your neighbour, your boss or your gym instructor. They go like this: ATGC…and so on. The four same letters over and over in endless different combinations. What makes […]

Tracking back human civilization there are evidences of dog domestication as far as 10,000 years ago. During this time, the ancient wolves’ genome evolved to give rise to the domestic dog that gradually adapted to human habitat as many […]

In 1968, the Canadian psychologist from McGill University Ronald Melzack described pain as being multidimensional and complex, with sensory-discriminative, affective-motivational and cognitive-evaluative components . Such definition may be a hint as to why the biological meaning of pain has […]