Author archives: César Tomé

MI weekly selection #61

MI weekly selection #61

Humanities & Social SciencesScienceTechnologyWeekly Selection

By César Tomé

Highly conductive graphene nanoribbons Graphene nanoribbons can conduct electricity much better than was expected. The new graphene nanoribbons differ from other forms by having no rough edges allowing electrons to move ten times more swiftly than theory says they should. The results could have implications in the development of high-end electronics. Nature News Advanced bionic […]

MI weekly selection #60

MI weekly selection #60

Humanities & Social SciencesScienceTechnologyWeekly Selection

By César Tomé

Paleontologists find evidence sauropods lived into Cretaceous period A sauropod belonging to the dinosaur group Titanosauria appears to have lived during the Early Cretaceous period providing evidence that sauropods lived beyond the Jurassic period. The remains of a juvenile Yongjinglong datangi were uncovered in northwestern China. International Science News Luhman 16B, where it rains liquid […]

MI weekly selection #59

MI weekly selection #59

Humanities & Social SciencesScienceStatisticsTechnologyWeekly Selection

By César Tomé

Light on X chromosomes To better see how females turn on and off their X chromosomes, scientists at Johns Hopkins University have developed a way to get X chromosomes from different parents to light up in different colors. Dr. Jeremy Nathans and his team engineered mice to breed female babies with X chromosomes from one […]

MI weekly selection #58

MI weekly selection #58

Humanities & Social SciencesScienceTechnologyWeekly Selection

By César Tomé

Tiniest particles can now be put on the scale Tiny technology that uses a fluid-filled microchannel in a silicon cantilever can measure the mass of particles down to the attogram, or one-millionth of a trillionth of a gram. The technology, developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, sends particles through the microchannel. Their passing changes […]

MI weekly selection #57

MI weekly selection #57

Humanities & Social SciencesScienceTechnologyWeekly Selection

By César Tomé

Ancient strips of bamboo hold multiplication table A multiplication table in base 10 has been revealed in ancient strips of bamboo found in China that date back to around 305 B.C. About 2,500 bamboo strips were donated to Tsinghua University in Beijing five years ago, and researchers discovered ancient Chinese calligraphy written on the strips […]

MI weekly selection #56

MI weekly selection #56

Humanities & Social SciencesScienceTechnologyWeekly Selection

By César Tomé

Quake lights likely caused by grinding rocks in rift zones The mysterious lights sometimes reported before or during earthquakes occur most frequently in geological rift zones. Researchers say the glow emanates from electricity generated as rocks grind together along vertical faults during temblors. Nature News Sea anemones living underneath Antarctica ice shelf A large number […]

MI weekly selection #55

MI weekly selection #55

Humanities & Social SciencesScienceTechnologyWeekly Selection

By César Tomé

Vaccine to protect against staph infections in rabbits Researchers have created a vaccine that has the potential to prevent pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an animal model. The vaccine targets toxins secreted by the staph bacteria, preventing it from causing serious infections. Results may explain why human trials have […]

MI weekly selection #54

MI weekly selection #54

Humanities & Social SciencesScienceTechnologyWeekly Selection

By César Tomé

Unique shrub provides insights into flowering plants’ evolution The genome of the shrub Amborella trichopoda has provided researchers with clues about how flowering plants have evolved, according to a study published in Science. The shrub is known to grow natively on the island of Grande Terre in the South Pacific and nowhere else, and is […]

MI weekly selection #53

MI weekly selection #53

Humanities & Social SciencesScienceTechnologyWeekly Selection

By César Tomé

Crocodiles, alligators use lures to attract prey Alligators and crocodiles use lures to entice prey, the first reported use of tools by reptiles. Researchers surveyed alligators and crocodiles at four sites in Louisiana for a year, noting that the creatures balancing twigs and sticks on their snouts to lure birds during nesting seasons. “Use of […]

MI weekly selection #52

MI weekly selection #52

Humanities & Social SciencesScienceTechnologyWeekly Selection

By César Tomé

Hummingbird species evolved to live in oxygen-thin Andes Some species of hummingbirds, which need lots of oxygen to survive, have evolved to thrive in the oxygen-poor heights of the Andes. Researchers sequenced 63 hummingbird species’ DNA and found that the mutations that allow the Andes birds to breathe at high altitudes occurred at the same […]